Martizaabdel

The international airport in Syria’s capital of Damascus resumed flights on Thursday nearly two weeks after an airstrike attributed to Israel that caused serious damage to the facility, a private company said.

The June 10 airstrike caused significant damage to infrastructure and runways and rendered the main runway unusable.

Israel’s military has declined to comment on the airstrike. The facility is located just south of Damascus, where Syrian opposition activists say Iran-backed militiamen are active and have arms depots.

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Israel’s Prime Minister Naftali Bennett on Wednesday announced that he will vote against a bill barring a lawmaker charged with a serious crime from becoming prime minister.

After Bennett and Foreign Minister Yair Lapid announced Monday that they decided to dissolve the coalition amid its struggles to properly function, several parties that back the government decided to move forward with the controversial legislation. The bill is widely seen as targeting opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu, who is being tried on criminal charges of bribery, fraud and breach of trust.

If passed, the bill would block any Knesset member indicted for a crime that includes a minimum sentence of three years and a moral turpitude clause from being tasked by the president with assembling a government, such as Netanyahu.

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Yitzhak Moyal, chairman of the Construction and Wood Workers Union within Israel’s Histadrut labor federation, said, “We’re lacking about 40,000 workers, in 10 different professions. We’re hoping to receive about 15,000 Moroccan construction workers, in a few batches. This could really improve the pace of construction in Israel.

The Moroccan workers could begin arriving in Israel by the beginning of 2023, he added.

They would earn higher salaries in Israel, Moyal noted. The average annual salary in Morocco is approximately $11,400, while the minimum wage for construction workers in Israel is almost twice as much.

Israel suffers from a shortage of both construction workers and caregivers for the elderly and the infirm, most of whom are foreign workers.

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WHO’s chief said on Wednesday the blockade on the Tigray region in war ravaged Ethiopia preventing access to deliver food and medicine has created “hell” and described the situation as an “insult to humanity”.

He even compared the Ethiopian conflict to the one in Syria and Yemen: “Humanitarian access even in conflict is the basics. Even in Syria, we have access, during the worst of conflicts in Syria. In Yemen, the same, we have access. We deliver medicine. Here [in Tigray] nothing, it’s a complete blockade.”

The year-long war between Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s government and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) has claimed the lives of thousands and displaced more than two million people.

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The Knesset’s Economic Affairs Committee on Monday approved expanding enforcement measures for two-wheeled electric vehicles, particularly motorized scooters and bicycles.

The move will allow city inspectors to penalize riders for additional offenses, with the aim of promoting road safety.

The idea of giving local inspectors more authority on this issue was spearheaded by Transportation Minister Merav Michaeli and Public Security Minister Omer Barlev.

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The central Israeli city was ranked the most gay-friendly city in Israel yet again by The Aguda — The Association for LGBTQ Equality in Israel.

Tel Aviv, known for being the most gay-friendly city in the Jewish state, has come out on top yet again in the Aguda’s annual rankings, released every June on the occasion of Pride Month.

The highest-ranking northern Israel city is Haifa, which finished joint-fourth along with Herzliya and Ramat Hasharon. Haifa is the home of a number of “diverse LGBTQ+ communities which together form the local community,” the index reads.

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A strike by Tunisia’s largest trade union ground the country to a halt despite last-minute attempts by the country’s president, Kais Saied, to prevent it from taking place.

The Tunisian General Labour Union (UGTT) called for the country’s three million public-sector workers to strike and it said most took part on Thursday, which led to closed airports, public transport, ports, and government offices.

The workers protested Saied’s decision to freeze wages and cut subsidies as part of the government deal to secure a $4bn loan from the International Monetary Fund.

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US coalition forces said they captured a senior Islamic State group bomb maker in an airborne operation before dawn Thursday in northern Syria.

A war monitor and AFP correspondents said military helicopters touched down for only a few minutes in a village in an area controlled by Turkish-backed rebel groups.

The Islamic State group’s top leaders however often take cover in areas controlled by other forces and where its own fighters are not active.

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Bloomberg.com reports that the case is Ellis v. Google LLC, Google having to pay out $118 million settlement to over 15,000 female employees for gender discrimination. The settlement was reached immediately upon conclusion of the case and involves women across 236 job titles.

According to David Neumark, an economist at University of California at Irvine, those leading the lawsuit stated that Google paid female employees approximately nearly $17,000 less than males who have the same job titles.

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Martizaabdel

Martizaabdel

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